Andréia Coutinho Louback

Andréia Coutinho Louback smiles broadly in this 2021 headshot. Her black hair is worn in long braids with some pulled back from her face. She wears large white pearl earrings, and a white square-neck blouse trimmed in red and decorated with blue and red flowers.
Natural Resources, Environmental and Climate Policy
Bio

 

About Andréia Coutinho Louback

Andréia Coutinho Louback is passionate about social justice and has 10 years of experience in communication. She has a master's degree in Ethnic Racial Relations at the Federal Institute of Technology (CEFET/RJ) and a bachelor's degree in Journalism from Pontifical Catholic University (PUC-Rio). Currently, she works as a consulting and specialist on climate justice in different organizations of civil society in Brazil.

In 2018, she worked in the Institute for Climate and Society (iCS), one of the main Brazilian climate organizations, where she built an institutional communication from scratch, and developed a lot of products and initiatives. In 2019, she organized the first panel about climate justice in Brazil in the 25th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations on Climate Change (COP25), in Madrid. In 2020, Andréia worked on a climate justice project at Alana Institute, where she ran some campaign planning, and mobilized climate networks.

Presently, Ms. Louback is one of the few specialists in race and climate change in Brazil. She is responsible for coordinating an unprecedented publication about climate justice in the Climate Observatory, that reach out narratives and stories about women and all vulnerable population affected directly by climate change. She keeps her position as a spokesperson at different initiatives about climate, gender, race, and intersectionality.

At her yearlong Humphrey Fellowship, UC Davis, she intends to investigate how Brazilian black movements have been affected by climate change and environmental justice, and how Brazil can develop climate justice policies focused on social justice and human rights inspired by the United States' experience.

Please contact Ms. Louback at aclouback@ucdavis.edu

Available for:

  • Speaking about climate justice, gender, and environmental injustice in Brazil
  • Teaching about climate communications at universities, workshops, and schools
  • Visiting local communities affected disproportionally by climate change effects

Related SDGs:

On a red-orange background are a combined symbol for man and woman with an equal sign in the center of the circle, the number 5 and the words, "Gender Equality"
On a magenta background are an equal symbol surrounded with arrowhead symbols pointing out like compass, the number 10, and the words "Reduced Inequalities"
On an orange background are an illustration of four city buildings, the number 11, and the words "Sustainable Cities and Communities""
On a green background is an illustration of an eye with the global as the iris, the number 13 and the words, "Climate Action."

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