How to train your donkey

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QUINN SPOONER / AGGIE

By Foxy Robinson, The California Aggie

"For six years, the annual Donkey Welfare Symposium has brought donkey researchers, equine experts, veterinarians, enthusiasts, undergraduate and veterinary graduate students and companions together for a three-day experience highlighting the donkey’s importance for communities across the world.

This year’s symposium was organized by Eric Davis, a veterinarian at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine International Animal Welfare Training Institute, his wife Cindy Davis and Amy McLean, an equine lecturer at the UC Davis animal science department, UC Davis Global Affairs and the non-profit Donkey Sanctuary.

“There aren’t that many veterinary-skilled people that look after the welfare of donkeys, an important animal particularly in Africa and other areas across the world,” said Ermias Kebreab, the associate vice provost of Academic Programs Global Affairs. “Being exposed to the Donkey Welfare Symposium could create opportunities for vet students who would want to have a career in animal welfare as an intern for future Summer or Quarter Abroad programs.”

While donkeys generally don’t get a lot of respect, they are vital to human well-being across several national and international communities. In countries like Mali and Tanzania, donkeys are important for carrying water and for the well-being of families. They have social and economic impacts on many communities.

Researchers came from over 14 countries through the UC Davis Global Affairs “Global Education for All Initiative” to create a space for global curiosity and opportunity for animal welfare.

“There aren’t that many veterinary-skilled people that look after the welfare of donkeys, an important animal particularly in Africa and other areas across the world,” said Ermias Kebreab, the associate vice provost of Academic Programs Global Affairs. “Being exposed to the Donkey Welfare Symposium could create opportunities for vet students who would want to have a career in animal welfare as an intern for future Summer or Quarter Abroad programs.”"

Read the full story at The California Aggie

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